Cloud Computing: Pros and Cons


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Trying to decide whether cloud computing for your company? Before you make any decisions, consider the pros and cons.

Drawbacks:

  • One issue that many business owners worry about when using cloud computing is security. They figure that as long as their important documents and information are stored locally, their data is safe. While that’s not true, as anyone who’s been hacked knows, the best way to combat this fear is to ask questions when interviewing cloud companies. Find out what their security measures are to ensure that your financial, personnel, banking and other sensitive information is as secure as if it were in a safe deposit box.
  • Unlike the one-time outlay of capital when purchasing a server, with cloud computing you will have ongoing monthly costs. In addition to subscription fees, paying for your bandwidth can prove a costly enterprise. Doing your homework to find out exactly how much it will cost is essential.
  • You’ll be at the mercy of your Internet connection. If the Internet is down, you won’t be able to access your data. While stronger and more pervasive Internet connectivity is rapidly rendering this problem obsolete, it’s still an issue.

Benefits:

Allows IT department to be more than a server babysitter.

If your IT guys don’t have to worry about constant server updates and other computing issues, they’ll be free to focus on innovation.

Automated updating.

No longer do IT personnel need to worry about keeping software up to date.

Catastrophe insurance.

If your office burns down, is leveled by a tsunami or swept up by aliens, your data is safe, stored in the cloud instead of the server in the broom closet.

Collaboration.

In the olden days, your staff could only collaborate when they were in the same room. Not anymore.

Flexibility.

As long as you have an Internet connection, you can work wherever and whenever you want.

Less expensive to run.

Since you don’t have to buy software (and all the subsequent updates and upgrades), you save a bundle. You only pay for what you need, and many cloud computing apps are free. Typically you pay a monthly fee, giving you the opportunity to pay for only what you use, not a bunch of extra stuff that you don’t even know what it is.

Level playing field for small companies.

Your startup can use the same tools that Fortune 100 companies on your terms and budget.

Quick and easy to set up and maintain.

How quick and easy? As setting up a Hotmail, LinkedIn or Facebook account.

Scalability. You can scale your usage up or down according to demand. If you have busy and slow seasons, this can really help you manage your finances.

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Source by Nathan Jansch


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